ATLANTA - Three-year-old Korbin Jackson loves a challenge and Instagram loves Korbin Jackson.

"I happened to take a video of him nailing the target, and he got really excited and showed so much happiness about making the shot," Brian Jackson, Korbin's dad, said. "So we put it on Korbin's Instagram."

For the Jackson family, a plan to use social media to keep in touch with relatives living across the country soon turned in something else entirely when a video of then two-year-old Korbin sinking a shot into a mini soccer goal went viral.

"Folks are sending us DM's," Jackson said. "More so about how he made their day. We knew we were kind of on to something, but when we save on to something, more of spreading positive vibes and also his story."

But Jackson said few online know what Korbin's faced behind the camera.

When the CEO of the @HarlemGlobetrotters wants #TrickShots, I deliver! 🏀🔥

A post shared by Korbin Jackson (@korbin_jackson) on

"We didn't know something was wrong with Korbin until a family member said his neck’s leaning a certain way," Jackson said, adding the first time parents soon became concerned.

Their search for answers ended up at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta where a physical therapist also referred the family to Dr. Jorge Fabregas.

The situation "snowballed" from there, Stephanie Jackson, Korbin's mom, told 11Alive News. The family learned Korbin not only had scoliosis, he also had Infant Torticollis as well as Duane Syndrome affecting his eye movement. The triple diagnosis could delay development if not addressed, also dimming Korbin's chances of playing high-impact sports when older.

"God may have taken something away," Stephanie said, "But he gave him something else."

That something else? An ability to brighten others' day, stranger or not. His bubbly personality and passion for trick shots grabbing not only Instagram's attention but also the amazement of doctors monitoring his condition.

"He's setting an example for other kids in the region," Dr. Fabregas said. "And now on social media, nationwide, worldwide of 'look what I can do, regardless of any limitation I have.'"

Korbin's parents' hope? Sharing the story behind the viral trick videos will inspire other parents to seek answers and treatment when needed as well as push the limits of what's possible.

"No matter the condition, all things are possible," Stephanie said. "Korbin's really showing us his physical disability is not going to stop him."

Korbin's videos can be found on Instagram as well as Facebook. Any royalties from his videos currently go in a savings account for college. While Korbin may require surgery in the future to address his Scoliosis, he's been cleared for --and enjoying-- micro soccer.

Micro Shockers 👟⚽️⚡️

A post shared by Korbin Jackson (@korbin_jackson) on