Chocolate is everywhere these days, from scented candles and avocado brownies to chicken and ale.

Now, add your nose to that list.

Coco Loko has introduced a new kind of snuff that melts in your nose, not in your hand.

No, you don't break off a piece of your Kit Kat bar and shove it up a nostril, rather the brown powder is snorted to provide an energy buzz.

The raw cacao snuff's website claims, "it is even used by athletes to give them the natural competitive edge." The product also allegedly provides a "calm focus" and helps reduce anxiety and stress.

Orlando-based Legal Lean — the company that makes the powder it claims will help you work, rest and play — could not be immediately reached for comment.

On Amazon, a 1.25-ounce container, about the size of a shot glass, costs $24.99. It is also selling on Legal Lean for $19.99.

According to The Washington Post, the founder of Legal Lean invested $10,000 into creating his own version of the "raw cacao snuff" that was popularized in Europe.

While there's no wrong way to eat a Reese’s, that might not be the case with raw cacao. The reviews on Amazon weren't good. The two posted read, "Terrible. Does nothing. Sniff cocoa powder instead lol. Waste of money" and "The white 'chocolate' stuff is better. But it's only available from local retailers..."

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration hasn't said if it will regulate Coco Loko.

"The FDA is not prepared to issue a determination regarding whether and how this product is subject to FDA jurisdiction at this time," Peter Cassell, an agency spokesman, said. "In reaching that decision, FDA will need to evaluate the product labeling, marketing information, and/or any other information pertaining to the product’s intended use."

He added that the FDA wasn't aware of any consumer complaints or illnesses associated with it currently.

Dr. Steven Gold, an ear, nose and throat specialist in Hackensack, N.J., said he doesn't know if snorting chocolate is safe or not. Drugs, both legal and illegal, are snorted, because absorption is faster through the many blood vessels in the nose.

"The lining of the nose is a moist mucus membrane," he said. "I don’t know what the effect of chocolate on it would be. Intuitively, we eat chocolate and it doesn't damage our mouth, but without studying it, how do you know what the effect is?" he asked. "I prefer eating chocolate – for now."

Catherine Park is an Associate Digital Producer for 11Alive News and contributed to this story.