ATLANTA, Ga – Voters in Fulton County, both inside and outside the city of Atlanta, are considering three separate proposed tax hikes that would raise money for transportation.

Voters inside the city of Atlanta will consider two proposals that, if passed, would raise the sales tax nearly a penny, while voters in unincorporated Fulton County and thirteen cities outside Atlanta will consider a 3/4 of a penny tax for road improvements.

Mayor Kasim Reed is pushing a "yes“ vote on the two Atlanta proposals.

“I think people want access to bike trails...I think people want mobility and they want expanded EV outlets in the city of Atlanta,” says Reed.

In Atlanta, voters will consider a ½ sales tax hike that would raise $2.5 billion over 40 years to expand public transit. Among the proposals would be 30 miles of light rail. Part of that would include an expansion of the city’s controversial street car. There’s a plan to expand MARTA’s heavy rail west along I-20, and to add bus rapid transit along Northside Drive and I-20.

The entire list of projects can be found on the MARTA website.

In a separate vote, the city of Atlanta will consider a .4-cent sales tax hike that would raise money to expand the Beltline, add hiking trails, sidewalks, streetscapes, and for road and traffic signal improvement. There’s also a proposal to expand the city’s bike share program.

Those projects can be found on the city’s website.

Outside of the city, residents of unincorporated Fulton County and thirteen cities outside Atlanta will consider a 3/4 of a penny sales tax to raise money for a variety of projects that don't include public transit.

“We felt that road improvements, interchange improvements, bridges, bike paths, pedestrian walks, sidewalks, that was more of the immediate need,” says Fulton County Commission Chairman John Eaves.

Each area has its own list of proposed projects and would divide revenues from the tax according to population.

The list of Fulton County projects can be found on the county’s website.

Fulton County may introduce another sales tax hike next year that would involve public transit.