As the metro area wakes up after Irma, many are without power. Across the entire state, more than one million people are in the dark.

Georgia Power and other companies are working to restore your lights but for some neighborhoods, that could take up to a week.

"There is not a region within this state that has not been affected by some power outages," said Paul Bowers, Georgia Power president and CEO.

"Our focus is to get power customers back on line, get to normal as fast as we can," he said.

POWER OUTAGES

Still waiting for your power to come back on? Turn on one of your lights so you'll know when it's restored. And use a flashlight for emergency lighting. Emergency officials warn candles can easily cause fires.

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FOOD SAFETY

If your power was out for more than two hours, you should go through your refrigerator and freezer to remove any potentially spoiled foods. If you kept your doors shut, food can stay safe in a fridge for up to two hours and up to 48 hours in a freezer. Foodsafety.gov provides more details, including a list of foods and how long they'll remain fresh during an outage.

You can also use dry ice -- put it directly into your fridge and freezer to keep it cold. You will have to replenish it. Another option is to use your washer as an emergency cooler. Fill your washer with ice to keep your food and drinks cold while the power is out. As the ice melts, the water will drain leaving you with no mess.

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GENERATORS?

Using a portable generator is another idea to help you cope if you don't have power. If you do use one, make sure to keep it outside and away from your home for multiple reasons.

The first one is, the carbon monoxide in the engine's exhaust. It's invisible and odorless and very deadly, so you should never run a generator indoors, or, just like your car, in a partially enclosed space like a garage. ONLY operate them outdoors with plenty of ventilation, far from windows, doors, crawlspaces and vents.

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