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Superstorm Sandy tapering off

9:13 AM, Nov 1, 2012   |    comments
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Video: New York Begins Arduous Clean Up After Sandy

Video: Delaware Gov. Markell surveys damage from helicopter

Worker uses a backhoe to move sand near a boardwalk after superstorm Sandy, Atlantic City, New Jersey

PHILADELPHIA -- It felt like Superstorm Sandy would never go away. But its days are numbered.

PHOTOS | Superstorm Sandy

The storm is winding down days after it swamped the East Coast, buried states in snow and killed dozens of people.

The National Weather Service says the last effects of the remnant low that was Sandy are being felt in the Appalachian mountains.

The storm brought up to 3 feet of snow to parts of West Virginia and Maryland and put thousands in the dark. The Weather Service says several more inches are possible before the storm dies out for good later this week.

New York struggles, Obama tours New Jersey damage

It's beginning to sound like New York again. The closing bell rang at the New York Stock Exchange. Jammed busses crept along in snarled traffic because subway trains still aren't rolling. In the air, some jets have started taking off again from JFK and Newark Airports. LaGuardia will have limited service Thursday morning.

Superstorm Sandy has killed more than 70 people. More than 6 million households and businesses, most of them in the New York area, still don't have power. Progress is being made. Water is being pumped out of subway stations and limited train service will resume Friday. The shows are going again on Broadway.

In New Jersey, President Barack Obama saw the devastation for himself. In some shoreline communities, streets are still canals and there is widespread devastation from high winds and Sandy's storm surge. With Gov. Chris Christie at his side, Obama vowed that storm victims won't be forgotten and will get the help they need. Christie, an active backer of challenger Mitt Romney, praised Obama for his response and thanked him for "his personal concern and compassion."

Obama said the federal response, including the military, will be focused on hardest hit areas of New Jersey, New York, Connecticut and West Virginia, where Sandy dumped heavy snow.

EPA grants 16 states clean gas waivers after Sandy

The Obama administration is temporarily waiving some Clean Air Act requirements in 16 states and the District of Columbia to reduce fuel disruptions from Superstorm Sandy.

Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Lisa Jackson says in a letter to governors that extreme circumstances related to Sandy will prevent enough gasoline from reaching consumers.

The waiver lets conventional gasoline be sold instead of cleaner-burning reformulated gasoline in Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Virginia and the District of Columbia. A blend of reformulated and regular gasoline will be allowed in Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Tennessee, South Carolina, and North Carolina.

The waivers last through Nov. 20.

The EPA also says New Jersey residents can use heating oil in emergency generators and pumps if cleaner diesel is unavailable.

NY governor: MTA subway, rail, bus fares waived

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo says the agency that runs New York City's subways, buses and commuter rails is waiving fares on Thursday and Friday to help ease recovery from the superstorm.

Cuomo says the Metropolitan Transportation Authority fare waivers are to encourage people to use mass transit instead of driving into the city.

Parts of the city were flooded and lost power when the storm hit on Monday.

Limited subway service is expected to start on Thursday. City buses are running, and limited commuter rail service has started.

Amtrak plans to restore some NYC service on Friday 

Amtrak says it plans to restore some service on Friday to and from New York City, which has been without intercity train service since it was walloped by superstorm Sandy.

The railroad said the removal of water from flooded train tunnels under the Hudson and East rivers is continuing so that repairs to tracks, signals and power systems can be made. A Friday schedule is expected to be released Thursday.

Service to Newark Liberty International Airport in New Jersey has been restored, but Northeast Regional service between Newark and New Haven, Conn., and Acela Express service for the length of the Northeast Corridor are canceled for Thursday. Empire Service between New York City and other cities in the state, and Canada are also canceled for Thursday.

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