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ATLANTA-- Most employees know if they're typing away at a company-owned desktop computer, someone is watching. What you search and send can be filtered and recorded. But what happens when you bring in your personal device and use it for work? Or when you pack up to go home, and bring your work device with you? The answers get a little trickier.

"The hacker target is shifting towards mobile devices, so you'll start to see more and more stories about malware and bad applications," Rolf Versluis said. He's the Chief Technology Officer for AdCap Network Systems. He says they're witnessing a new frontier on the role personal mobile devices play in the workplace.

First, as customers: "You should be a bit concerned that companies are spending vast sums of money to put all of their servers in a secured data center with firewalls, and all of that information goes out to a cell phone that can be lost at a bar." He said, "just like government policy lags technology, company policy lags technology"

Companies are now trying to catch up using what's called mobile device management (MDM) systems. It's based on an application that goes on your phone and manages security.

That brings up the next concern. If companies insist you install a secure app, do they have access to your personal information on that same phone? Versluis says no, mostly. But "they're going to be able to see where you have the device and every app that you install." He suggests turning off the GPS when you're not at work.

Also, if you're logging onto a company network, even your personal device, be aware. "People should realize that if you're on a company network, everything that goes through is usually kept track of, if not monitored," he said.

Another mobile device is paying out in court right now. Up to 200 Chicago police officers could sign onto a lawsuit alleging they were pressured to answer work-related emails and phone calls, but not paid for their time. The federal court case could trickle down to companies nationwide.