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ATLANTA -- For most of the day every chair was occupied at Hydration Station.

Owner Keith McDermott figured that would be the case given that it was New Year's Day.

"It cures a hangover like nothing else," said McDermott.

He's talking about the 1000 ml lactated ringer bag with saline and electrolytes offered to customers through an IV drip that he says quickly replaces lost fluids. Employees including EMTs, nurses and physician assistants offer a variety of hydration packages ranging in price from $49 to $99. They also offer to add vitamins and medications that curb aches and pains, nausea and indigestion.

First time client Matt Brown said he was willing to try it, after waking up with a pounding headache.

"I know that hangovers are mostly just from being dehydrated, and instead of trying to drink tons of water I thought why not try an IV," said Brown.

In fact, McDermott says one lactated ringer, known as a "banana bag", is equivalent to 2 and a half gallons of water.

"People could drink that much water, but I don't think they'd like the side effects they'd feel," said McDermott.

It is legal. Hydration Station is licensed as a physicians office because the co-owner is an ER doctor who practices in Georgia.

11Alive's Duffie Dixon asked the station's medical correspondent, Dr. Sujatha Reddy, about the safety aspect.

(sot 3:21:28) it's probably not going to hurt you, I do think its relatively safe. It may not help you, but you may be willing to pay that kind of money to find out," said Dr. Reddy.

Reddy said it is similar to the treatment you'd receive at a hospital or urgent care center in that a nurse or technician usually administers IVs.

McDermott insists that's the real selling point.

"You can get the same treatment at a hospital or urgent care center, but you're going to pay well over $100 just by walking in the door.

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