Here's what has Google, Microsoft and Facebook nervous

Apple found itself in some hot water, after the European Union said the iPhone maker owed Ireland 13 billion euros ($14.5 billion) in back taxes, according to a Tuesday ruling. Apple and Ireland will appeal the ruling, in a process that could take years.

Apple owes Ireland a giant tax bill. Ireland says don't worry about it.

The European Union says Apple owes Ireland $14.5 billion in back taxes, but the country doesn't want Apple to pay it. Weird? Let us explain. There are three big players in this story: The European Union, Apple and Ireland. What the EU says: Apple owes because tax breaks that Ireland gave the company were against EU rules. What Apple says: It didn't break any laws, it's appealing, and it's confident the ruling will be reversed. What Ireland says: We're on Apple's side. Part of the country's economic strategy is to woo foreign companies. Google, Amazon, Microsoft and Facebook all have facilities in Ireland because the corporate tax rate is lower than in the U.S. Ireland is worried this ruling could send them packing, and it has other tech giants nervous that they too will be getting a hefty tax bill.

Good intentions, meet government gridlock

The Rafael Ramos and Wenjian Liu National Blue Alert Act sailed through Congress in 2015 after New York Police Department officers Ramos and Liu were ambushed in their patrol car by a man who posted on Instagram that he was targeting police in retaliation against police-involved killings. New York officials were never made aware of the threat, and the law was meant to make sure that didn't happen again by creating an early warning system for specific threats against police officers. Fifteen months later, the administration has yet to implement a single provision of the law. Even after attacks in Dallas and Baton Rouge that left eight officers dead this summer, the national Blue Alert is still lost in a bureaucratic maze. The Justice Department told USA TODAY that it took more than a year just to determine which office would be responsible for implementing the law. SMH.

Donald not getting the love from his fellow one-percenters

Based on their donations, the majority of the economic elite are "with her." Since April, when it became clear Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton were the likely presidential nominees, big donors have sent $134 million to Democratic super PACs, while the top donors kicked in just $51 million to super PACs on the Republican side. And a lot of those GOP donors are giving to groups more focused on "down ballot" races — fighting to make sure the GOP keeps its majority in the House and Senate — than on helping the Trump campaign. The thing about super PACs is they can accept unlimited amounts of money, and USA TODAY found that just 156 people, who have given at least $1 million, make up 60% of the money those groups have raised this election cycle. Retired hedge-fund manager Thomas Steyer alone has given more than $38 million. Wow.

Related: Meet the mega-donors

Apparently the only thing worse than ITT Tech commercials is ITT Tech

ITT Technical Institute has stopped enrolling students at all of its campuses after the Education Department banned it from enrolling new students who depended on federal loans to pay for classes. The Obama administration is cracking down on for-profit colleges like ITT. Critics say these schools' high default rates on student loans combined with low graduation rates make them a bad bet for federal funds. ITT had 137 campuses across 39 states at the end of June. There is some good news: If ITT closes, the Education Department has suggested it'll forgive the federal loans of existing students. Former ITT grads or dropouts may also be able to get their loans discharged.

Maybe not such a happy Labor Day

Not in a union? You'll still care about this study. There's been a steep decline in union membership in recent decades, and new research shows that has meant lower wage increases for everyone. The study out Tuesday from the liberal-leaning Economic Policy Institute found average weekly earnings for non-union, private-sector male workers would have been 5% higher in 2013 if the share of union workers had remained at 1979 levels. Just mull all the ways you would have used that extra $2,704 on Labor Day sales.

Extra bites

With 111 more commutations, President Obama has nearly doubled his total in one month.

Kim Jong Un executed two senior officials with an anti-aircraft gun, according to a South Korean newspaper.

Meet the cast of Dancing With the Stars Season 23:

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This is a compilation of stories across USA TODAY.

Contributing: The Associated Press 


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