Snakes are coming out of hiding for the summer, and people across the country have found them in some weird places, like their cars and air vents.

For most people, finding a snake in your house is not something you want to see.

RELATED | Your guide to the six venomous snakes in Georgia

While it's not extremely common, it does happen.

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"I average about three a week," said Patrick O'Briant with Critter Wranglers, LLC.

He said snakes aren't trying to bother you. In fact, they want to stay away from you.

RELATED | What to do if you are bitten by a snake!

But if they're looking to cool down, the shade of your house can be a good option.

"They can get through pretty much anything that is general ease of access," said O'Briant. "Everyone knows snakes don't have hands. If they can push it, they'll push it to get into a place."

O'Briant said there are a few popular ways that snakes can get into your house:

  • Getting in through the crawl space
  • Crawling up through gutters
  • Going through any open door, screen or doggy door
  • Chasing a rodent into the dryer line

O'Briant has been called to remove snakes from cars, floor vents, crawl spaces, dryers and other hiding spots inside a house.

When a snake gets inside, he said people want to know all the places it could have hidden.

"Where is the snake, where could it be, where could it be hiding," said O'Briant. "Essentially the answer is anywhere that the snake can fit its body is where it can be."

He said they'll usually go to warm places low to the ground, so you're not likely to find one in your bed or bathtub.

If you do find a snake somewhere you'd rather not have one....

"Don't scream, don't agitate it, assume that it's trying to get out of the house as much as you want it out of the house," said O'Briant.

He said the most common snakes people see are black or gray rat snakes.

They're not venomous, but there are just a couple kinds of snakes in East Tennessee that are.

To avoid any mishaps, O'Briant advises you not to try and catch a snake if you're not trained to do so.

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