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New restrictions in place for Atlanta BeltLine

The BeltLine will be available for certain uses during specific times.

ATLANTA — Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms has said for weeks that she wanted to keep city parks and the BeltLine open because it was vital to residents' physical and mental health. 

She did, however, threaten to close them if people were using them for more than just exercise. 

Over the weekend, a petition came out urging the Mayor to shut down the Atlanta BeltLine after crowds have been seen packing the popular trail. 

There are growing concerns in about whether residents are following the rules first put in place to help slow the spread of COVID-19 - and some believe people on the Atlanta BeltLine might be among the biggest violators. 

Nearly 9,000 people have signed the petition as of Tuesday afternoon. 

On Tuesday, during a conference call with city council members, Bottoms placed some guidelines on use of the BeltLine.

The BeltLine will be open for the elderly and those most vulnerable 6 a.m. to 10 a.m.

From 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., it will be open for exercise use.

From 2 p.m. to 6 p.m., it will be open for transportation use (going to the store, jobs etc.). 

There are more than 1,100 cases in Fulton County, as of Tuesday afternoon, with 36 deaths reported. 

11Alive is focusing our news coverage on the facts and not the fear around the virus.  We want to keep you informed about the latest developments while ensuring that we deliver confirmed, factual information. 

We will track the most important coronavirus elements relating to Georgia on this page. Refresh often for new information. 

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