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Health officials: At least 77 percent of residents at senior living community test positive for COVID-19

The Fulton County Board of Health also reported there have been 15 resident deaths.

SOUTH FULTON, Ga. — Gov. Brian Kemp continues to say that the "aging population" is the most vulnerable when it comes to COVID-19.  

Data at one senior living community in metro Atlanta show that 77 percent of its residents have tested positive for the virus, according to the Fulton County Board of Health

Health officials said Arbor Terrace at Cascade has a total of 62 residents and 48 of them have tested positive for COVID-19. One resident is in the hospital.

They also report that 15 residents have died. 

Although health officials' numbers reflect 48 resident cases, a spokesperson for Arbor Terrace at Cascade told 11Alive that as of Tuesday, they had 52 resident cases. 

The Fulton County Board of Health added in its data that multiple staff members at the senior living community have also tested positive, with a few who had to be hospitalized. 

The number of coronavirus cases has climbed exponentially in the community. Back on March 31, a spokesperson for the community said they were aware of seven residents at Arbor Terrace at Cascade that had COVID-19. The residents had been asked to quarantine in their apartments to help reduce the spread of illness in the community. The facility was cleaned and they also had also supplied masks, goggles and gloves.

11Alive is focusing our news coverage on the facts and not the fear around the virus.  We want to keep you informed about the latest developments while ensuring that we deliver confirmed, factual information.  

We will track the most important coronavirus elements relating to Georgia on this page. Refresh often for new information.  

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