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What health experts say about caring for animals during COVID-19 pandemic

Officials recommended that people sick with the virus limit contact with animals until more information is known about COVID-19.

ATLANTA — Concerns over animals and the coronavirus continue to grow after news broke that a tiger at a zoo in New York has the virus.

According to the United States Department of Agriculture, this is the first instance of a tiger being infected with COVID-19. The USDA said samples form the tiger were taken and tested after several lions and tigers at the zoo showed symptoms of respiratory illness. 

"Public health officials believe these large cats became sick after being exposed to a zoo employee who was actively shedding virus," the USDA said.

Questions arise if people can give the virus to animals and what animals are at risk. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says on its website that although there have been no reports of pets becoming sick with COVID-19 in the United States, it is still recommended that people sick with the virus limit contact with animals until more information is known about COVID-19. 

"This can help ensure both you and your animals stay healthy," the CDC's website says.

Here are some guidelines the CDC suggests if you must care for pet if you are sick:

  • When possible, have another member of your household care for your animals while you are sick.
  • Avoid contact with your pet including, petting, snuggling, being kissed or licked, and sharing food.
  • If you must care for your pet or be around animals while you are sick, wash your hands before and after you interact with them.

In the United States, the CDC said, there is also no evidence to suggest that any animals, including pets, livestock, or wildlife, might be a source of COVID-19 infection at this time. 

However it's always important to practice good pet hygiene; for anyone who has questions about their pet's health,  the CDC suggests talking to their veterinarian.

RELATED: Watch adorable kittens takeover closed Georgia Aquarium

Below are some of the questions and answers that were listed on the USDA's website about the tiger case and other general  topics about animals

Can people give this virus to animals and, if so, what animals are at risk?

This is the first case [the New York tiger case] of its kind. We are still learning about this new coronavirus and how it spreads. This case suggests that a zoo employee spread the virus to the tiger. Further studies are needed to understand if and how different animals could be affected by COVID-19. State animal and public health officials will continue to work closely with USDA and CDC to monitor this situation and will conduct additional testing if it is warranted.

If multiple animals were showing symptoms, why was only one tested?

Only one tiger was tested as the collection of diagnostic samples in big cats requires general anesthesia. Since all tigers and lions were exhibiting similar respiratory symptoms, the attending veterinarian felt it was in the best interest of the animals to limit the potential risks of general anesthesia to one tiger for diagnostics.

If animals can catch the virus, can they give it back to people?

At this time, there is no evidence to suggest that any animals, including pets or livestock, can spread COVID-19 infection to people.

Will this finding prompt additional testing of animals?

No. This is an evolving situation, however, routine testing of zoo or personal animals is not recommended at this time. Public and animal health officials may decide to test certain animals that are showing signs of illness and that are known to have been exposed to the virus. More information about how those decisions will be made is available here: https://www.aphis.usda.gov/animal_health/one_health/downloads/faq-public-on-companion-animal-testing.pdf

Should any animal showing signs of respiratory illness be tested?

USDA and CDC do not recommend routine testing of animals for this virus. Because the situation is ever-evolving, public and animal health officials may decide to test certain animals out of an abundance of caution. The decision to test will be made collaboratively between local, state or federal public and animal health officials.

Should I avoid contact with pets or other animals if I am sick from coronavirus (COVID-19)?

You should restrict contact with pets and other animals while you are sick with COVID-19, just like you would with other people. Although there have not been reports of pets becoming sick with COVID-19 in the United States, it is still recommended that people sick with COVID-19 limit contact with animals until more information is known about the virus. When possible, have another member of your household care for your animals while you are sick. If you are sick with COVID-19, avoid contact with your pet, including petting, snuggling, being kissed or licked, and sharing food. If you must care for your pet or be around animals while you are sick, wash your hands before and after you interact with pets. More information is available on how to keep people and animals safe at https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/daily-life-coping/animals.html.

What should I do if I think my animal has the virus?

Call your veterinary clinic with any questions about your animal’s health. In order to ensure the veterinary clinic is prepared for the household animal, the owner should call ahead and arrange the hospital or clinic visit. Make sure to tell your veterinarian if your animal was exposed a person sick with COVID-19, and if your animal is showing any signs of illness. Veterinarians who believe an animal should be tested will contact state animal health officials, who will work with public and animal health authorities to decide whether samples should be collected and tested.

Could this affect tigers or other animals at other zoos across the United States?

There is no evidence of this virus affecting animals at any other facilities in the United States. However, anyone sick with COVID-19 should restrict contact with animals, including pets, during their illness, just as they would with other people. Although there have not been reports of pets becoming sick with COVID-19 in the United States, it is still recommended that people sick with COVID-19 limit contact with animals until more information is known about the virus. If a sick person must care for a pet or be around animals, they should wash their hands before and after the interaction.

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