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Georgians hopeful to get vaccine as number of doses sent to state set to increase

President Biden took action Tuesday, increasing the weekly vaccine supply to Georgia by more than 25,000 doses starting next week.

ATLANTA — More COVID-19 vaccine doses could be on the way to Georgia. President Biden announced Tuesday an increase to weekly vaccines going out to states. 

But, what does this mean for people who are eligible, but haven’t been able to get the vaccine yet?

In the short term, more vaccines to Georgia means more people should be able to get the vaccine. Getting an appointment is still really tough, but Gov. Brian Kemp said the state will be ready when more doses come. 

Bob Lambert, 76, of Cartersville is like a lot of Georgians: eligible, but still anxiously waiting to get a COVID-19 vaccine. 

"I’m frightened. I don’t want to get [COVID]," Lambert said.

He falls into the current 1A+ group that includes adults aged 65 and older. He’s tried his local health department in Bartow County, with no luck, along with Publix, Walgreens and Kroger. 

"As soon as you find out on television they’re doing it, you run to your computer. I’m 76 years old I’m not the most ... technology person there is. By the time I get there they’re full," he said.

There may be a sign of hope coming. President Biden took action Tuesday, increasing the weekly vaccine supply to Georgia by more than 25,000 doses starting next week.

That could move Georgia’s current 120,000 doses per week to145,900 doses per week. 

"I’m just like hoping and praying that it will mean something for me," Lambert said, hopeful. 

He said he misses seeing his eight grandkids and eight great-grandkids. He hasn't seen them since Christmas. 

In a press conference Tuesday morning, Gov. Kemp said Georgia will be ready for the increase. 

Through executive order, Kemp said he plans to expand the number of health care workers who can administer shots. The state would also work with counties to make sure resources are in place to handle demand for scheduling appointments.