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The first week of school is almost over and 5,200 students don't have a device to learn on

Guilford County Schools is working on two solutions. One involves money and device donations. The other, learning centers.

GREENSBORO, N.C. — Yes, 78,000 devices have been ordered for Guilford County Schools' students to do remote learning and for teachers as well. The problem is, those devices won't come in until late November and the first week of remote learning is almost over. 

About 10,000 devices were handed out to students since July. However, the district is still short 5,200 devices. There are two solutions. 

Solution #1 Donations of devices & money

If you have a gently used device that includes audio, a camera, and a charging cable, please bring the device to:

Greensboro-- 712 N. Eugene Street

High Point--  900 English Road

The district offices are open Monday-Friday until 6 p.m. If you need to schedule a time other than that, please call the district offices (336) 370-2300

The district's IT crew will wipe devices clean for students to use. 2WTK recommends wiping your device before you bring it in to protect your information.

CONSUMER REPORTS: HOW TO WIPE A DEVICE CLEAN OF DATA

Community members can also purchase a new device by donating the cost of a device (approximately $350) to a fund at the Guilford Education Alliance (GEA) 336-841-4332. If you're wondering why the GEA can buy devices now while the district can't, it's because the district is bound to get bids on anything they buy. The GEA does not and can buy directly from any retailer. 

Solution #2 Learning Centers 

Learning centers will be open at various schools starting August 31 from 9 a.m. -noon. Students can come and use devices or bring their own and use the broadband internet. The list of centers is being finalized now.  

"Parents will register their students for learning time. We will have adults there to assist students, but it is not school, it's not intended to replace the school learning online. There will not be live teaching there," Dr. Whitney Oakley, Chief Academic Officer said.