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Georgia will waive standardized testing for schools next year

Earlier this year, Georgia became one of the first states in the nation to suspend standardized testing requirements in the wake of the COVID-19 school closures.

ATLANTA — The state of Georgia will submit a waiver to the U.S. Department of Education for the suspension of the 2020-21 Georgia Milestones assessment and CCRPI school and district rating, Gov. Brian Kemp and State School Superintendent Richard Woods wrote in an announcement Thursday morning.

Also announced was the suspension of teacher evaluations for the 2020-2021 year.

Earlier this year, Georgia became one of the first states in the nation to suspend standardized testing requirements in the wake of the COVID-19 school closures.

The measure was then approved by the U.S. Department of Education, cancelling all remaining standardized tests in the 2019-2020 school year.

"Given the ongoing challenges posed by the pandemic and the resulting state budget reductions, it would be counterproductive to continue with high-stakes testing for the 2020-2021 school year," Kemp and Woods wrote. "In anticipation of a return to in-person instruction this fall, we believe schools’ focus should be on remediation, growth, and the safety of students."

According to the officials, Georgia is the first state in the nation to suspend standardized testing for the upcoming school year. 

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