The Forsyth County Coroner's Office has identified two children killed in a house fire early Saturday morning in Cumming.

According to the coroner's office, 12-year-old Shaun Noe, Jr. and 9-year-old Laura Noe were the victims in the fire at the house on Apple Valley Court. (Note: Forsyth County Schools lists the female as "Morgan", as do posts on the father's social page). 

First responders arrived at the house in the Lanier Heights subdivision just before 3 a.m. Saturday and found it fully engulfed in flames.

When firefighters were able to get inside, they found the bodies of the children.

Forsyth County Fire Division Chief Jason Stover told 11Alive on Saturday that they couldn't find anything nefarious that may have caused the blaze. 

"Based on the investigation, thus far, there's no indication of foul play," Stover said. "Our sincere condolences to the family experiencing this tragic loss."

RELATED: Family mourns as firefighters grapple with discovery of children's bodies in burned home

According to Forsyth County Schools, Laura Noe (identified as Morgan by the school system) was a 4th grade student at Cumming Elementary while Shaun Noe, Jr attended Otwell Middle School and was in the 6th grade. 

Forsyth County Schools spokesperson Jennifer Caracciolo said that additional counselors, social workers and psychologists will be at the schools this week.

A GoFundMe account has been created to help raise funds for the funeral expenses. Click here for information on how to donate.

In the letter sent home, Cumming Elementary Principal Jordan Livermore included these suggestions for parents of classmates of the victims:

1. Your child needs you now. Be there for him/her. 

2. Let your child talk, write, or draw about his/her feelings. 

3. An event like this can cause a child to recall past feelings about the deaths of family members or friends. Allow your child to express these feelings freely – time and time again. 

4. Your child may express the fear that you or other family members will die. That’s a very realistic fear. Assure your child that you are there for him/her. 

5. Death and dying conjure up different meanings to children than to adults. However, the facts of death should be explained to children naturally and lovingly. 

6. Let your child know that it’s OK to experience anger, hurt, guilt, sadness – and that sometimes these feelings overlap. Also, it is okay for your child to see you cry. 

7. The behavior of your child may change temporarily. For example, he/she may become more restless, have trouble sleeping, and act more hostile or more withdrawn.

Follow MyCummingNews for more news on Cumming.

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