ATLANTA — Over the past week or so, Atlantans have been limited in the types of activities they can engage in during the COVID-19 outbreak. With community members encouraged to stay at home as much as possible, most outdoor excursions are restricted to grocery shopping and take-out meals from local restaurants, all while practicing social distancing.

“My business has been totally transformed. A lot of what I do is home-based personal training with a focus on recovery rehab corrective exercise, ” said Kevin Snodgrass, Certified Personal Trainer at Dirty South Fit, “We're seeing that people’s quality of life has been taken away, their ability to hang out their friends, so it's easy to get depressed.”

Snodgrass, who has a background in mental health as well as personal training, has seen his business drastically impacted over the past week. Gyms and other communal workout spaces were ordered to close last week in the metro area, along with bars and restaurant dining rooms.

He tells My East Atlanta News that he has had to adapt his rules of engagement with the vast majority of his clientele. 

Here are 7 simple exercises from Snodgrass and Dirty South Fit to assist in taking care of your physical and mental health during the COVID-19 crisis:

  • Push-ups (standard or modified)
  • Squats
  • Lunges
  • Sit-Ups
  • Plank Hold
  • Burpies
  • Push-up / Plank / Shoulder Touch
  • Resistance Band routines (additional routine)

Snodgrass says that the benefits from daily physical movement to both our physical and mental health are ‘innumerable’ and that it’s important to stay connected and keep each other accountable, not only for our physical well-being but our mental welfare as well.

To learn more about Dirty South Fit’s free online workout routines, click here.

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