EAST COBB, Ga. — Representatives from the American Society of Interior Designers are preparing for their annual art gala, and the non-profit is partnering with four different charities in the process.

“This year, we decided for the art gala to pair up professional artists to work with participants from each nonprofit for an art experience that will result in some unique pieces of art,” JC Caldwell, Director at Large for the Georgia chapter of ASID, said. “That will be put together into one large piece, to be auctioned off at the art gala, along with artist pieces that will also be auctioned off, to benefit these charities.”

Janet Armstrong, an encaustic artist, visited the MUST Ministries headquarters Friday to help some of the shelter women create original art for the gala, which is coming up on December 5.

Non-profits join forces to benefit community
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“I paint with wax, which is what makes it different,” she said. “Encaustic is a Greek word. It means to burn in. It’s the act of fusing wax with heat so that's what makes it a different kind of art.”

Each woman created two works of art – one they could take home, and one for the gala.

“I know firsthand how art can be therapeutic and healing and transformative, so that's part of our goal, not only to benefit the charity with money, but also each participant will walk away with transformation and some healing, steps towards empowerment,” Caldwell said.

The theme of the artwork was birds.

Non-profits join forces to benefit community
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“A lot of these people are in hard situations or have been in hard situations and are kind of beyond their big hump, and I think there's a lot of ways they can relate the bird to themselves,” Armstrong said. “They can color birds in camouflage versus a coat of many colors versus a journey that they've seen themselves go through.”

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