There are more than 130,000 Instagram posts dedicated to drinking a familiar household vegetable. The celery juice craze has grabbed celebrity attention and social spotlight as a healing fix for many health woes.

But are the claims around celery juice all that they seem? To verify, let's look at the root of the juice, the vegetable itself.   

Celery contains vitamins C and K as well as fiber, folate and water, and research also documents celery's antioxidant components while some studies even say celery may help fight cancer and reduce inflammation.

But does celery juice deserve the hype? Emma Laing, clinical associate professor at the University of Georgia’s Department of Foods and Nutrition, explains the difference.

“Generally consuming vegetables, whether they're in a juice form or whole form is a good thing,” Laing said. “Juicing, you do strip away the fiber, which is a good component of health. But I would say for the average person, consuming vegetables, in general, should be the main goal."

However, Laing said current research does not support online claims surrounding celery juice's benefits.

“People may think it's a cure-all for chronic illness, and we just don't have the data to back that up,” Laing said.

While the vegetable is verified as a healthy pick, the claims surrounding celery juice's benefits have yet to be verified. Laing said to be wary of going overboard on a fad without checking with your doctor, especially if you're on medication.

Science aside, how hot is the trend? The Fresh Market verified “demand for celery has skyrocketed!” According to the chain’s spokesperson, the Fresh Market’s overall celery sales are up 68 percent in April.

A Publix spokesperson verified that the grocery chain is also seeing an increase in demand. According to a Publix spokesperson, shoppers will soon be able to buy celery juice directly in Publix stores.

While research is still scarce on the juice, Laing said drinking celery juice can be incorporated, as long as it doesn’t interfere with a balanced diet.

“Eating a variety is what's important and if celery can be part of it, I say go for it,” Laing said.