Al Roker is defending his Halloween costume after some social media users accused the weather anchor of whiteface following the Megyn Kelly scandal.

The hosts of the "Today" show went all-out for their Halloween broadcast Wednesday, re-enacting the '80s most iconic movie scenes and paying homage to its musical icons. Roker went "Back to the Future" as Doc Brown, who was played by Christopher Lloyd.

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Megyn Kelly, the former host of the third hour of "Today," was missing from the festivities after defending blackface last week on her now-canceled program, which sparked mass controversy in the process.

Some viewers, however, questioned why it was OK for Roker to dress up as a Caucasian character, while Kelly ultimately lost her job over her remarks.

One Twitter user said: "@alroker: @megynkelly is a terrible person to even suggest that it is Ok for a white person to go as a black character for Halloween. Also @alroker: Goes as Doc brown, a white character from a movie for halloween. #Hypocrites #Whiteface"

Another user wrote on Facebook: "Megyn Kelly loses her show because she posed a question about dressing as an admired character of color if you are of Caucasian background —and yet Al Roker dresses today as a beloved character from an iconic movie who happens to be Caucasian. Is there some hypocrisy in there?"

Roker used his own social media account to respond to the people who don't get why his '80s theme outfit is not an example of whiteface.

"I’m going to say this one last time, but the folks who get it, understand and the ones who DON’T, won’t," the journalist began. "I can be Doc Brown, and I wear the outfit and wig and not change my skin color.

He continued: "If you’re white, you can be President Obama if you want. Just don’t color your skin!"

Roker vocalized his criticism of Kelly's blackface comments, following her apology to fellow coworkers.

"The fact is, while she apologized to the (NBC) staff, she owes a bigger apology to folks of color around the country," Roker said last week on-air. "This is a history going back to the 1830s minstrel shows to demean and denigrate a race. It wasn't right."

He continued: "I'm old enough to have lived through 'Amos 'n' Andy,' where you had white people in blackface playing two black characters, just magnifying the worst stereotypes about black men — and that's what the problem is. That's what the issue is."

Contributing: Erin Jensen and Maeve McDermott