DULUTH, Ga. — Stacey Abrams stopped in Duluth Monday evening to continue her "Thank You" tour. The candidate for governor, who lost to Brian Kemp, is traveling to cities across the state post-campaign season to thank her supporters.

While at the Sonesta Gwinnett Place, 11Alive talked to her about a possible Senate run.

"I have I think an extraordinary set of opportunities before me and my responsibility is to make sure I pick the one that makes sense - that I'm the right person, it's the right job and the right time," she explained.

In January, Abrams visited Washington to meet with Senate Democrats about a possible 2020 US Senate run for current Republican Sen. David Perdue's seat.

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According to multiple reports, Abrams visited with Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer (D-NY) and Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto (D-Nev.), chair of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee. If Abrams does choose to run for Senate, she would find an already growing number of candidates who have announced or are considering running against Perdue.  

Perdue is a strong supporter of Trump's border security and Mexican border wall initiatives. Abrams said Monday she would make a decision by next month.

"By the end of March, I'm going to decide based on a set of rubrics that are for me. (That) should be the way you decide to run for office, not just because a job is available, but because it's the right job and I'm the right person," she said. "I need to make certain that it's the right time for me to do that."

"When I think about our current senators, I've had a very good working relationship with Johnny Isakson," Abrams continued. "He and I have disagreed fundamentally on some issues. I think that his position on ending the shutdown was the right one. He's has done extraordinary constituent services. "

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She said in the past as a state leader, she's had to turn to his office to get things done. However, her relationship with Sen. Perdue hasn't been as close.

"I really fundamentally disagreed with his ideology and his behavior, and so that is one of the reasons that I'm giving very strong consideration of running for the Senate," Abrams said. "I think we need a senator who reflects the needs and the values of Georgia and I do not believe he's serving all of Georgia."

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Abrams also mentioned her work as she fights for fair elections in the state. She believes her own election was unfairly managed, along with others.

"What we are doing is filing a comprehensive lawsuit that says any individual interference with the right to vote is wrong, and when you have a system of interference that is absolutely and totally in violation of the U.S. Constitution, and that's what we are going to fight for," she said.

Her group, Fair Fight, is pushing for a change to the state's election system.

Abrams was recently tapped to deliver the Democratic response to President Trump's State of the Union address. During that speech, she also talked about voter suppression and Georgia's election laws.