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Fisherman reels in 110-pound monster of a fish in Georgia

Tim Trone's catch of a massive blue catfish beats the previous record by more than 17 pounds.
Credit: Georgia DNR
Tim Trone with new Georgia record-holder for blue catfish

OMAHA, Ga. — A Florida man in Georgia waters has just handily broken a state record with his catch of a massive blue catfish.

The Georgia Department of Natural Resources reports that Tim Trone of Havana, Florida is the new record-holder after catching a 110-pound, 6-ounce example of the species during a fishing tournament on Oct. 17. The new record beats the old by more than 17 pounds.

The big fish also measured in at 58 inches long and 42 inches in girth.

“Georgia has such great fishing opportunities, and we love to hear about this kind of exciting news,” said Thom Litts, chief of fisheries for the Wildlife Resources Division, in a recent statement. “This is our first state record since last April, and I hope it encourages all anglers to get outdoors and Go Fish Georgia!”

The DNR reports that the blue catfish, known in scientific communities as Ictalurus furcatus, is just one of several types of catfish in Georgia. Others include the channel catfish, flathead catfish, white catfish, and the brown, flat, snail, spotted and yellow bullheads."

Besides their ability to grow so large, the blue catfish is identifiable by its silvery-blue color and having a "humped" back along with a forked tail and small eyes. It also carries the cat-like whiskers that give these fish their common name.

And while the current catch is proof that they can grow over 100 pounds in weight, these fish are typically from one to 20 pounds in the Peach State.  You can find them in large rivers, reservoirs, and tributaries as they like fast water.

You can purchase a fishing license at www.gooutdoorsgeorgia.com. For more details on current state-record holders and how they're identified, visit the state's record program webpage.