ATLANTA -- In 1983, Marsy Nicholas was killed by her boyfriend.

Billionaire Henry Nicholas, Marsy's brother, spent millions of dollars of his own fortune campaigning for a new law named after his sister in every state -- Marsy's Law.

It could give crime victims in Georgia more rights -- things like updated information on their case and the right to be included in every court proceeding.

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The wording on the ballot can be confusing -- the words "Marsy's Law" won't be included. Here's what you'll see:

"Shall the Constitution of Georgia be amended so as to provide certain rights to victims against whom a crime has allegedly been perpetrated and allow victims to assert such rights?"

Here's the translation -- A yes vote means you want Georgia's Constitution to give crime victims more rights. A no vote means you don't want Marsy's Law included in the Georgia State Constitution.

But why would anyone be against helping crime victims?

Two words -- "unintended consequences."

South Dakota approved a similar amendment in 2016.

They had to change it back in 2018 because it cost the state too much money. Some even said it was making it harder to investigate crimes. Supporters of Marsy's Law say they just want victims to have the same rights as the accused.

So, you're the voter. Whether it's added in Georgia is up to you -- and your vote -- on Nov. 6.